Posts Tagged With: News & Observer

“Wild Wild Love” for Flat Duo Jets

FDJWWLBefore I moved to North Carolina in 1991, there were only a few local bands I knew much about. But one I had already come to know and love was Flat Duo Jets, the guitar-and-drums duo of Dexter Romweber and Chris “Crow” Smith. I’d caught the Jets on tour the previous year in Denver, opening for The Cramps, and their space-age bossa-nova rockabilly still stands as one of the most amazing spectacles I’ve ever witnessed. It also turned out that the News & Observer editor who hired me for the paper’s rock-writer job just happened to be married to Dexter’s manager, which was something else I considered a major selling point.

Once I got here, I became even more of a Flat Duo Jets acolyte, writing about them every chance I could in the paper as well as magazines including No Depression and Spin. And when I wrote my novel “Off The Record,” I modeled the unhinged rock-star protagonist as a mixture of Dexter and Ryan Adams.

All of which has led up to my latest and possibly most ambitious non-fictional spiel about the Jets to date, as part of a new reissue being released this week — Wild Wild Love (Daniel 13), an honest-to-God vinyl box set centered on their 1990 full-length debut album Flat Duo Jets. Along with abundant outtakes and rare tracks, the package includes a beautifully illustrated 40-page booklet featuring vintage photos and three essays, one of them a scene-setting band history by me that weighs in at more than 9,000 words. The other two essays are by Flat Duo Jets producer Mark Bingham; and Josh Grier, who produced the Jets’ 1984 cassette-only EP (In Stereo), which will be on vinyl for the first time in this box set.

Look for Wild Wild Love in better records stores on Saturday, April 22, as part of Record Store Day.

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George Lawrence, fare thee well

GeorgeL.jpgWriting is a mostly solitary pursuit that involves a lot of what Stephen King (among others) calls “ass in chair time.” But there are times when other people do enter into it and leave their mark, especially when they turn up at a particularly opportune moment. That goes for George Lawrence, a former News & Observer co-worker of mine who passed away in his sleep Monday morning at age 58.

Not quite six years ago, I was slogging through the obligatory horrible first draft of “Losering” and doing what one does: trying to convince myself it would be worth the agony while dealing with the usual cocktail of insomnia, insecurity, self-loathing and various other emotional goodies induced by book-writing. In the midst of all that, I bumped into George at a Neil Young show in Durham that I was reviewing for the paper.

I hadn’t seen George in a while and we got to talking about Ryan Adams, who he’d known well enough to be one of his local party buddies back in the day. And as soon as he found out I was writing a book about Ryan, George perked right up and provided just the dose of enthusiasm I needed to get over the hump. George wound up being one of my best sounding boards as I worked to wrestle “Losering” to the ground, which earned him a place of honor in the “Acknowledgements” section on page 202:

A special few went truly above and beyond the call of duty: Dean Dauphinais, Tracy Davis, and George Lawrence for being extra eyes, and voices of enthusiasm when I was at my lowest ebb.

rsglLong before all this, George was an N&O fixture by the time I got there in 1991, holding multiple editing and managerial jobs in the newsroom. What I remember most about George back then was him being the life of the party at out-of-office gatherings or pickup softball and basketball games, always quick with a quip and a backslap.

Eventually he left journalism to go into PR and consulting, but it was a choice he seemed to regret. I’d hear from him intermittently, and he’d talk wistfully about how much he missed writing and wanted to get back to it. He’d send me the occasional piece of rock memorabilia, too, like this vintage framed Rolling Stones album cover (which I’ve got hanging on the wall right next to my record collection at home).

George did have his struggles in recent years, and he was in and out of the hospital repeatedly with a lot of health problems. But he’d still pop up now and then on Facebook, to lob a song lyric my way or ask a question about some band or other. Several times over the past year, I had the thought that I really ought to check in on him; right now I’m feeling a little guilty for not making more of an effort to follow up.

Of course, if George were here, I expect he’d brush that off with a self-deprecating joke — or maybe he’d drop another lyric. His last words to the world on his Facebook page came a few weeks back, a quote from the late great Texas troubadour Townes Van Zandt’s epic of betrayal “Pancho and Lefty”:

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Somewhere in the great beyond, I picture George seeking out Townes to have a word about that.

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Bookmarking Scuppernong

ScuppernongWhat will most likely be my final round of “Comin’ Right at Ya” promotion happens later this week, with a couple of book events over in the greater Greensboro/Winston-Salem Triad vicinity. Friday evening (Sept. 9), I’ll be at Greensboro’s Scuppernong Books to chat about “CRAY” as well as “Losering” as part of Scuppernong’s Words of Note Festival — which coincides with the National Folk Festival and 17 Days Festival, both happening concurrently in Greensboro.

BookmarksThe next day (Saturday, Sept. 10), I’ll be in Winston-Salem for the annual Bookmarks Festival. My bit happens from 12:30 to 1:15 p.m. Saturday on the City Stage of Winston Square Park (on Spruce Street right by the Hanesbrands Theatre), a panel called “What’s in a Name? Eye-Catching Titles.” I’ll be there alongside “Good Morning, Midnight” author Lily Brooks-Dalton; and Steven Sherrill, author of “The Minotaur Takes His Own Sweet Time.”

Bookmarks is bringing in close to 50 writers for this year’s edition and the author list  includes best-selling novelists Jonathan Safran Foer and John Grisham, as well as a couple of my former News & Observer colleagues, Debbie Moose and Bridgette Lacy. The complete Bookmarks 2016 schedule grid is below.

Both of these events are free, so I hope to see some folks.

BookmarksSked

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Connells greatest hits, and mine

ConnellsSCYIt’s not a book, exactly, but it’s something that appears in a compact disc booklet (remember those?). That would be Stone Cold Yesterday: Best of The Connells, a greatest-hits package that Concord Music Group is releasing on Sept. 9, with liner notes written by yours truly. These are the first liner notes I’ve done since Tres Chicas’ debut album Sweetwater way back in 2004, and it was a great honor to be asked. The Connells are a group I’ve been writing about ever since I moved to Raleigh 25 years ago, and regular readers of this space might recall the most recent instance of that — the “’74-’75” video remake we put together for the News & Observer last fall.

Of course, “’74-’75” is on the 16-song track list, which you’ll find below. And for those in the general Triangle vicinity, The Connells will play a free show Sept. 8 at Raleigh’s Schoolkids Records (for the store’s Hopscotch Day Party); and an outdoor show at Raleigh Little Theatre’s Stephenson Amphitheatre on Sept. 17, on a bill with modern-day local stars The Old Ceremony and David J of Bauahus/Love and Rockets fame.

 

1. Stone Cold Yesterday
2.’74 – ‘75
3. Still Life
4. One Simple Word
5. Crown
6. Carry My Picture
7. Slackjawed
8. Something To Say
9. Scotty’s Lament
10. Over There
11. Fun & Games
12. Get A Gun
13. Maybe
14. Uninspired
15. Just Like That
16. New Boy

ConnellsLiner

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Big in Europe: The Connells’ “’74-’75,” updated to 2015

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The Connells, 1993.

When Ryan Adams made his way from Jacksonville up to Raleigh in the early 1990s (as outlined in the “Before” section of “Losering”), there were a handful of big fish in the Triangle music scene — Corrosion of Conformity, blackgirls and Superchunk, among others. But one of the biggest was the Connells, who were part of a wave of jangly guitar-pop bands that followed in R.E.M.’s wake. While the Connells were a popular regional draw on the college-radio chitlin circuit of the Southeastern U.S., their music was accessible enough that they always seemed like a band that should have been bigger elsewhere, too.

By the time Ryan was hitting his stride with Whiskeytown in 1995, however, the Connells suddenly were bigger elsewhere. And not just big, either, but huge. In one of the Amerindie underground’s odder success stories, the Connells briefly hit the big time overseas in the mid-’90s with “’74-’75,” a pensive and moody ballad from the band’s 1993 album Ring.

“Big in Europe” is a well-worn joke in the music industry, but it really was true in the Connells’ case. Where Ring barely grazed the charts here in America (peaking at No. 199 on the Billboard 200), it made the Connells stars in Europe, with its “’74-’75” single going all the way to No. 1 in Norway and Sweden while cracking the top-10 in another nine countries across the continent. It even earned a platinum record in Norway to go with gold records in Germany and Sweden.

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David Hoggard in 1974 and again in 1993 with his wife Susan and daughter Alison, from Mark Pellington’s video of the Connells’ “’74-’75.”

A major part of “’74-’75″‘s success was its evocative video, which juxtaposed then-and-now images of members of the class of 1975 from Broughton High School in Raleigh with yearbook photos and footage shot in the fall of 1993. Two Connells members had also gone to Broughton; all three of my kids in recent years, too. Anyway, “’74-’75” is the rare video that actually enhances a song, never getting too heavy-handed while implying more than it says. It remains a great curio of mid-1990s North Carolina music.

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Alison and Susan Hoggard with a picture of David, who died in 2013. Still from video shot by N&O photographer Juli Leonard.

Back in 1994, when “’74-’75” was in the early stages of its run, I tracked down and interviewed all 16 people in it to do a story for the paper. In honor of the 40-year anniversary of Broughton’s class of 1975, we decided to update it again to the present day — but literally this time, by editing new footage of everyone into director Mark Pellington’s original video. The band’s representatives were kind enough to give us permission to do this; and we didn’t quite get full participation, but close: 15 of of the video’s 16 subjects agreed to be photographed again, as did the Connells themselves.

So here is “’74-’75” circa 2015, with superlative visuals and editing by two of my News & Observer photojournalist colleagues, Travis Long (whose work documenting local music in Raleigh has been referenced here before) and Juli Leonard; plus accompanying stories that explain a bit more about the video and where everyone in it is nowadays. Pulling this beast together was an immensely labor-intensive process, so we’re all somewhat relieved now that it’s finally done. But we’re also counting down to the 50-year anniversary in 2025.

We’ll see who all is still standing by then.

http://www.newsobserver.com/entertainment/arts-culture/article44889822.html/video-embed

ADDENDA: In response, nice Blurt essay by the estimable Fred Mills. And wow, over in England the BBC noticed!

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Asleep at the Pier

Publish a book about somebody, and you’ll hear from plenty of folks with anecdotes you didn’t hear in time — but also pictures. Here we have a photo taken by a News & Observer co-worker of mine, Chris Seward, a very fine photographer who has been shooting band photos around these parts for decades. This one captures Asleep at the Wheel onstage at The Pier, a fabled Raleigh nightspot that was part of the Cameron Village Underground (a district that still has enough of a cult-like following three-plus decades after it closed to draw a sellout crowd when the space was reopened to the public for one night earlier this year).

As for this picture, Ray Benson puts the year at about 1981 or ’82, which sounds right since The Pier closed in 1983. Along with Ray front and center with his guitar, it shows fiddler Paul Anastasio, Brenda Burns and MaryAnn Price on tambourine.

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Asleep at the Wheel at the Pier in Raleigh, NC, circa 1981. Photo by Chris Seward

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Missed chances from Ray Benson’s childhood

It never fails: Publish a book about somebody and people will show up as soon as it appears, relating stories you wish you’d heard in time to use. That happened a fair amount when “Losering” came out three years ago, and the pattern is holding with “Comin’ Right at Ya,” too.

After an excerpt from the book appeared in this past Sunday’s News & Observer, I heard from a gentleman named David Weiss, who lives in my neck of the woods nowadays but knew subject/star/co-writer Ray Benson in suburban Philadelphia way back when. He had a few tales and details about Ray’s childhood that would have been great to try and work in. Too late for that now, but at least I can share them here. Writes David:

I grew up across the street from the Seifert clan. Ray’s older brother Mike was my best friend from the time we were 4 years old all the way through high school. Little brother Ray was always tagging along with us (even though we tried to ditch him most of the time). I last saw Ray at Mike’s funeral several years ago and was pleasantly surprised by how warmly he greeted me, considering that we weren’t always very nice to him as the tag-along little brother.

The Seifert house was such a wonderful contrast to my own home across the street that I spent most of my time there. I said at Mike’s funeral that Bobbie (Mrs. Seifert) probably felt like she had five kids instead of just her own four. Their house was always filled with music. Bobbie Seifert was very creative and artistic, and Mike was an all-county saxophone, clarinet and recorder player. Funny that I don’t recall Ray being particularly musical as a child.

Their household was also, to put it politely, chaotic. You could jump from the open stairwell onto the living room couches with your shoes on (which we often did) and nobody said a word. Ray was as accident-prone as anyone I ever knew. Whenever he showed up at Chestnut Hill Hospital emergency room it was, “Ray, are you back again?” He split his chin open on a trampoline, got a large fish hook stuck through his finger, was hit in the head with a pipe. I’m sure there were other incidents that Ray may remember better than I do.

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You can read it in your Sunday papers: News & Observer excerpt

N&OlogoThe book-writing gig is fun and all, but it’s still a sideline project to my main occupation — arts reporter and music critic at Raleigh’s daily newspaper, The News & Observer, my primary professional address for the past 24 years. My editors there were kind enough to consent to running a “Comin’ Right at Ya” excerpt, which is in the Sunday paper.

Check that out here, and then come on out to one of this month’s reading-type appearances for “Comin’ Right at Ya”:

Thursday, Oct. 8 — Books & Brew at The Roost in Pittsboro (5-8 p.m.). Also appearing will be Eddie Huffman, discussing his John Prine book; and Elliott Humphries playing a few songs.

Sunday, Oct. 18Texas Book Festival at the State Capitol Auditorium in Austin, Texas (4:15 p.m.). Co-writer/subject/star Ray Benson will be at this one, too, so it should be well worth checking out. I expect he’ll play at least a song or two.

Wednesday, Oct. 21 — Quail Ridge Books & Music in Raleigh (7 p.m.). I’m doing this one solo, so maybe I’ll break out the cowboy hat.

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Coming in Rocktober: The Texas Book Festival

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The author lineup is out for the 2015 Texas Book Festival (a great time on the festival circuit, the literary world’s equivalent of South By Southwest), and I’m very pleased to report that yours truly made the cut. I’ll be appearing with my “Comin’ Right at Ya” subject/co-writer, the legendary Ray Benson, and we’ll be doing…well, something.

To be honest, I’m not entirely sure just what Ray and I are going to do yet, or even where or when; maybe some sort of Q&A session involving an Asleep at the Wheel performance. But I can tell you that it will happen sometime on Oct. 18 in Austin — and I believe it will be a free event. This will be my second time at TBF, following a very fun and enlightening 2012 appearance when I was promoting “Losering.”

RBTBF

The one and only Ray Benson.

Me aside, it’s a great-looking lineup of authors featuring Kristin Hersh (about whom I’ve raved at some length in this space) among the other festival participants. Other music-related participants include my fellow rock scribes Jessica Hopper and “Dean of American Rock Critics” Robert Christgau; and from the non-music end, a long-ago News & Observer co-worker of mine, Joby Warrick (nowadays a certifiably big deal Washington Post reporter, promoting a mighty important-looking book called “Black Flags: The Rise of Isis”).

Golly, the Austin Chronicle is referring to the author list as “The Mighty 300.” And here’s some more love for the lineup from the Dallas Morning News.

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Books, beer and insights into “Hell”

BooksBeerPerhaps you’ve noticed that the cover of “Losering” depicts a shattered beer bottle (and thanks again to cover artist Lindsay Starr, because that’s a pretty fair summation of how things went for Ryan Adams during his Whiskeytown days). If you’re an enthusiast of the sudsy as well as literary arts, come on out to this week’s “Books & Beer” at The Roost in Pittsboro’s Fearrington Village.

Books & Beer is an extraordinarily cool music/literary/beer-drinking series that presents two participants at a time, talking books in an informal atmosphere helped along by good spirits. This week’s installment features yours truly as well as Squirrel Nut Zippers alumnus Tom Maxwell, who will play some music and talk about “Hell,” the Zippers-era memoir he published last year.

As for me, I’ll probably talk a bit about the paper and “Losering” as well as my next book, if anybody’s interested, and maybe even the one after that (if you really want to know, come on out and ask). But mostly, I expect I’ll spend some time leading whatever audience we draw in a group interview of Tom, because he’s a hilarious and world-class raconteur as well as a fine musician and writer.

It should be a rousing good time, and I’m told that anybody who buys a book will get a free beer to go with it — in an unbroken container, no less. Hope to see you there.

 

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